Jump to content

Forecast Form: Art in the Caribbean Diaspora, 1990s–Today

Nov 19, 2022 - Apr 23, 2023

About the Exhibition

The 1990s were a period of profound social, political, and economic transformation. From the dissolution of the Eastern Bloc to the rise of transnational trade agreements, the decade’s large-scale shifts ushered in an era of international connectivity and social upheaval. In the cultural sector, art exhibitions expanded and turned global, and dialogues around identity, especially by those who have suffered systemic oppression, were featured front and center in cultural debates. The forces of this pivotal decade also had a major effect on the production, circulation, and presentation of art from the Caribbean.

Taking the 1990s as its cultural backdrop, Forecast Form: Art in the Caribbean Diaspora, 1990s–Today is the first major group exhibition in the United States to envision a new approach to contemporary art in the Caribbean diaspora, foregrounding forms that reveal new modes of thinking about identity and place. It uses the concept of weather and its constantly changing forms as a metaphor to analyze artistic practices connected to the Caribbean, understanding the region as a bellwether for our rapidly shifting times.

The exhibition is curated by Carla Acevedo-Yates, Marilyn and Larry Fields Curator, with Iris Colburn, Curatorial Assistant, Isabel Casso, former Susman Curatorial Fellow, and Nolan Jimbo, Susman Curatorial Fellow. It is accompanied by an expansive catalogue featuring scholarship as well as extensive plate sections reproducing exhibition artworks in full color. It includes essays authored by Carlos Garrido Castellano, Genevieve Hyacinthe, Aaron Kamugisha, and Mayra Santos-Febres, as well as a roundtable conversation with Carla Acevedo-Yates, Christopher Cozier, María Magdalena Campos-Pons, and Teresita Fernández. The exhibition is designed by SKETCH | Johann Wolfschoon, Panamá.

Exhibition Venues

  • ICA Boston, October 5, 2023–February 24, 2024

Artists

  • Adán Vallecillo
  • Alia Farid
  • Álvaro Barrios
  • Ana Mendieta
  • Candida Alvarez
  • Christopher Cozier
  • Cosmo Whyte
  • David Medalla
  • Deborah Jack
  • Denzil Forrester
  • Donald Rodney
  • Donna Conlon and Jonathan Harker
  • Ebony G. Patterson
  • Engel Leonardo
  • Daniel Lind-Ramos
  • Didier William
  • Felix Gonzalez-Torres
  • Firelei Báez
  • Frank Bowling
  • Freddy Rodríguez
  • Jeannette Ehlers
  • Joscelyn Gardner
  • Julien Creuzet
  • Keith Piper
  • Lorraine O’Grady
  • Maksaens Denis
  • María Magdalena Campos-Pons
  • Marton Robinson
  • Peter Doig
  • Rafael Ferrer
  • Rubem Valentim
  • Sandra Brewster
  • Suchitra Mattai
  • Tavares Strachan
  • Teresita Fernández
  • Tomm El-Saieh
  • Zilia Sánchez

Funding

Lead individual sponsorship for Forecast Form: Art in the Caribbean Diaspora, 1990’s–Today is generously contributed by Kenneth C. Griffin.

Lead support is provided by the Harris Family Foundation in memory of Bette and Neison Harris; Zell Family Foundation; Cari and Michael Sacks; the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts; Jana and Bernardo Hees; the Mellon Foundation; Gael Neeson, Edlis Neeson Foundation; and Karyn and Bill Silverstein.

Major support is provided by Julie and Larry Bernstein, Robert J. Buford, Citi Private Bank, Lois and Steve Eisen and the Eisen Family Foundation, Marilyn and Larry Fields, Nancy and David Frej, The Jacques and Natasha Gelman Foundation, Anne L. Kaplan, and Anonymous.

Generous support is provided by the Elizabeth F. Cheney Foundation and by Marisa Murillo.

This project is supported in part by the National Endowment for the Arts.

This exhibition is supported by Etant donnés Contemporary Art, a program from Villa Albertine and FACE Foundation, in partnership with the French Embassy in the United States, with support from the French Ministry of Culture, Institut français, Ford Foundation, Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, CHANEL, and ADAGP.

 2022/03/AndyWarholFoundation.jpg  2022/09/Mellon_Logomark_Lockup_Black.png  2022/09/citi-logo_rgb.jpeg National Endowment for the Arts LogoVilla Albertine logo

Transcripts

Deborah Jack, the fecund, the lush and the salted land waits for a harvest . . . her people . . . ripe with promise, wait until the next blowing season, 2022

In English

The audio in this artwork consists of a woman speaking about mining salt as a youngster, string music, excerpts from a 1948 Dutch documentary on St. Maarten, and the sound of the ocean.

TRANSCRIPT

[music]

You know, I am—I can tell a little bit about the salt pond, what I know. In that time, in the salt pond time, they were good times. They were good times. The people was very industrious. And they didn’t have nothing, no other alternative but the salt pond. And everybody, everybody used to work their own garden. Everybody worked their own garden.

And when the time come for the salt, because you had to . . . You couldn’t leave the salt pond, just run like that, the sea go in, come out, go in, come out. They had—it had to be taken care of.

[music]

En español

El audio consiste en una mujer que habla sobre extraer sal de joven, música de cuerda, unos extractos de un documental holandés de 1948 sobre San Martín y el sonido del océano.

TRANSCRIPCIÓN

[música]

Yo soy . . . Yo les puedo hablar un poco sobre el estanque de sal, sobre lo que sé. Esa época, en el estanque de sal, fue muy buena. Qué buena época. El pueblo era muy trabajador. Y no tenían nada, ninguna otra alternativa; solo el estanque de sal. Y todo el mundo trabajaba en su propio jardín. Todos trabajaban en su propio jardín.

Y cuando llegaba la hora de la sal, porque había que hacerlo… No podías salir del estanque de sal o simplemente salir corriendo. El mar entraba y salía, entraba y salía. Ellos tenían . . . Teníamos que ocuparnos de eso.

[música]

Keith Piper, Trade Winds, 1992

In English

The audio in this artwork consists of howling winds as well as excerpts from Burning Spear’s song “Columbus” and the 1984 documentary Africa: A Voyage of Discovery.

TRANSCRIPT

SPEAKER 1: The meeting place of the old world and the new was here.

[music]

Not the discovery of a brave new world. Not glorious Spanish conquistadors. The plantations, which followed Columbus and slavery. Contact with Europe is still seen as having brought with it little but disease, servitude, and deprivation. The destruction of Native peoples and culture.

SPEAKER 2: What about the Arawak Indians? What about the Arawak Indians?

SPEAKER 1: Contact with Europe is still seen as having brought with it little but disease, servitude, and deprivation.

SPEAKER 2: The Indians couldn’t hang on no longer. The Indians couldn’t hang on no longer. Here comes Black man and woman and children. Here comes Black man and woman and children.

SPEAKER 1: Not the discovery of a brave, new world. Not glorious Spanish conquistadors. The plantations, which followed Columbus and slavery.

SPEAKER 3: They were replaced by African slaves.

SPEAKER 2: What about the Arawak Indians? What about the Arawak Indians?

SPEAKER 3: Contact with Europe is still seen as having brought with it little but disease, servitude, and deprivation.

SPEAKER 2: What about the Arawak Indians? The Indians couldn’t hang on no longer. Here comes Black man and woman and children. Here comes Black man and woman and children.

SPEAKER 3: The overseas economies of European powers like England, France, Holland, and Portugal. The overseas economies of European powers like England, France, Holland, and Portugal profited mightily from sugar and from the slave trade needed to produce it.

SPEAKER 2: The Indians couldn’t hang on no longer. Here comes Black man and woman and children. The Indians couldn’t hang on no longer. Here comes Black man and woman and children.

SPEAKER 3: The meeting place of the old world and the new was here. The meeting place of the old world and the new was here.

SPEAKER 1: Not the discovery of a brave new world. Not glorious Spanish conquistadors. The plantations, which followed Columbus and slavery.

SPEAKER 3: Contact with Europe is still seen as having brought with it little but disease, servitude, and deprivation.

SPEAKER 1: The destruction of Native peoples and culture.

SPEAKER 2: What about the Arawak Indians? What about the Arawak Indians?

SPEAKER 3: Contact with Europe is still seen as having brought with it little but disease, servitude, and deprivation.

SPEAKER 2: The Indians couldn’t hang on no longer. The Indians couldn’t hang on no longer. Here comes Black man and woman and children. Here comes Black man and woman and children.

SPEAKER 1: Not the discovery of a brave, new world.

En español

El audio de esta obra de arte consiste en unos vientos soplando fuertemente además de unos extractos de la canción “Columbus” de Burning Spear y del documental de 1984 Africa: A Voyage of Discovery (África: un viaje de descubrimiento).

TRANSCRIPCIÓN

Próximamente.

Gallery Text

Exhibition Introduction

The 1990s were a decade of profound social and political transformations, when debates around identity and difference featured front and center. Forecast Form: Art in the Caribbean Diaspora, 1990s–Today takes the 1990s as its cultural backdrop, gathering artworks by thirty-seven artists who live in the Caribbean or are of Caribbean heritage, or whose work is connected to the region. The exhibition is anchored in the concept of diaspora, the dispersal of people through migration both forced and voluntary. Here, diaspora is not a longing to return home but a way of understanding that we are always in movement and that our identities are in constant states of transformation. This idea is seen in the artworks shown, which suggest movement and travel through forms, materials, and techniques.

Forecast Form also proposes that the Caribbean is a way of thinking, being, and doing that extends beyond its geographic borders, challenging our assumptions about Caribbean culture and its representation and reframing the relationship between identity and place. The exhibition also presents an idea through its title: that the Caribbean inaugurated the modern world, and that forms and their aesthetics allow us to analyze the histories and forces that continue to shape our contemporary moment, from emancipation and human rights to colonialism and climate change.

Forecast Form is curated by Carla Acevedo-Yates, Marilyn and Larry Fields Curator, with Iris Colburn, Curatorial Assistant, Isabel Casso, former Susman Curatorial Fellow, and Nolan Jimbo, Susman Curatorial Fellow. The exhibition is designed by SKETCH | Johann Wolfschoon, Panama.

Exhibition sections

TERRITORIES

The body is our first dwelling and the carrier of our personal and collective histories. Artist Zilia Sánchez, whose work is in this gallery, declares: “Soy isla,” or, “I am an island,” rethinking her own body and identity through place.

Although the word “territory” is often understood as a political concept, like nations and fixed borders, it is also a way to describe the psychic landscapes, or inner worlds, that inform our shared experiences. Whereas diaspora starts as the physical movement of people, its process results in new personal, cultural, and historical territories. Artists in this section approach these shifting territories using processes of transfer, layering, and concealment. Some artists take the body as a point of departure to mark time and space through movement, whereas others create abstract landscapes both real and imagined.

FORMAL RHYTHMS

The works on view here all suggest movement—not only depicting or capturing bodies in motion but also emphasizing movement through formal choices, materials, and techniques. Some artists in this section express the dynamism and energy of movement using color and gesture while oscillating between recognizable and abstract forms. Others include movement in their art-making processes, transferring materials from one place or surface to another. Each of these artistic strategies is a metaphor for how identities are shaped by constant transformation.

EXCHANGE

How does art making reflect cross-cultural exchanges? How do forms migrate and create new understandings of our entangled world?

Historically, the Caribbean has been a place of cultural exchange and economic exploitation, from the plantations of the colonial era to the tourist and oil industries that undergird today’s global economy. Culturally, the Caribbean is constantly being reconfigured through migrations and geopolitical relations with the Arab world, Asia, and the Americas, among other regions. In the works in this section, place is difficult to locate, as geographies collapse into one another and images question fixed origins and identities.

IMAGE MAKING

Making images and repurposing images from archives are important ways to create and preserve memory. Archival photography and video both serve this purpose, and artists often use them as source materials to create works that question dominant historical narratives. In this gallery, artists either use existing photographs and video or create their own images to examine the history of Black activism, racial categories, and identity formation across different locations—from Great Britain to Costa Rica, to the United States, Jamaica, and Haiti.

LANDSCAPE

What does the landscape hide? The exuberant, colorful, and lush beauty of the tropical landscape often conceals painful and violent histories. Rather than represent these histories in narrative ways, the artists on view in this section employ diverse techniques—often depicting the flora of a place, including trees and plants, as well as gardens— to reference histories of colonialism, migration, and resource extraction.

TRACES

People and places are shaped by the passage of time, leaving traces both seen and unseen. What traces remain from colonial histories, etched in the memory of bodies, places, and objects?

The Caribbean, as a geographic region, was shaped by the movement of gendered and racialized bodies, first as chattel slavery from Africa and afterward as indentured labor from India, China, and other locations. The legacies of colonialism, racism, and gender violence wound both the body and the landscape. Rather than representing these colonial histories, the artists in this section call attention to the traces they left behind through objects, materials, and gestures, which hold just as much of the past as they do the present and future.

Artwork labels

Engel Leonardo (b. 1977, Baní, Dominican Republic; lives in Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic)

Jimayaco, 2017
Clay, enamel, Guayacán wood, and alluvial gold

This sculptural installation is in part inspired by Engel Leonardo’s memory of observing women mine gold from rivers in Jimayaco, a town in the Dominican Republic’s central province of La Vega. Sitting atop two of the sculptures are bowls that resemble mining pans, which the artist has filled with clay, water, and pieces of gold, further evoking a rural way of life that has rapidly disappeared. The sculptures also take inspiration from Muñecas sin rostro, the artisanal, faceless dolls that emerged as souvenirs in the Dominican Republic in the 1980s and have since become a recognizable marker of Dominicanness. Contrasting the dark tones of Guayacán wood with the figures’ lighter enamel bodies, Leonardo comments on how constructions of Dominican identity have been shaped by the denial of Blackness in the Dominican Republic, upheld by legacies of colonialism and Rafael Trujillo’s dictatorship.

Colección privada

 

Felix Gonzalez-Torres (b. 1957, Guáimaro, Cuba; d. 1996, Miami, FL; lived in New York, NY)

“Untitled” (North), 1993
Light bulbs, porcelain light sockets, and electrical cords

“Play with it, please. Have fun. Give yourself that freedom.” These are some of Felix Gonzalez-Torres’s reflections on the open-installation protocol for the twenty-four light string works he made between 1992 and 1994, including “Untitled” (North).

While the meaning of these works is also open-ended, the (North) in the title offers a way to understand this work. Curator Nancy Spector proposes that the title references the Cuban saying “el norte,” a shorthand description for everything north of the island. Interpreted this way, the work—presented here as a curtain of light—imagines the “North” as a shifting geography and an elusive ideal.

Marieluise Hessel Collection, Hessel Museum of Art, Center for Curatorial Studies, Bard College, Annandale-on-Hudson, New York

 

Sandra Brewster (b. 1973, Toronto, Canada; lives in Toronto)

Wilson Harris: “even in my dream, the ground I knew I must not relinquish”, 2022
Photo-based gel transfer on the wall

Wilson Harris: “even in my dream, the ground I knew I must not relinquish” is a monumental portrait of the prolific Guyana-born writer Wilson Harris. To make this work, Sandra Brewster first printed individual images of Harris onto paper and bathed them in a gel medium, after which she pressed them onto the museum wall. Overlapping one another, the layered images reflect Harris’s own unfixed and nonlinear writing style. The image-transfer process, which also includes forcibly scrubbing away the paper and glue, leaves what Brewster calls “creases and tears,” visible metaphors for what is lost and gained through migration. After this exhibition closes, Harris’s portrait, even though sanded down and invisible to the eye, will remain embedded in the wall, a poignant reminder of the histories buried within cultural institutions.

Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago Commission

 

Denzil Forrester (b. 1956, Grenada; lives in Cornwall, United Kingdom)

Night Strobe, 1985
Oil on canvas

In the late 1970s and 1980s, in the dark, smoky nightclubs of London, Denzil Forrester would sketch scenes over a pile of paper, recording these clubs’ energies, lights, and movements. Working quickly—each drawing took only the length of a single song to make—Forrester completed upward of forty drawings each night. Forrester translated some of these drawings into dynamic paintings, such as Night Strobe. In the shadow of Margaret Thatcher’s racist and xenophobic Britain, the club, with traces of carnival and booming with dub, blues, reggae, and dancehall, was a crucial space of belonging.

The Rachofsky Collection

 

Alia Farid (b. 1985, Kuwait City, Kuwait; lives in Kuwait City and San Juan, Puerto Rico)

Mezquitas de Puerto Rico, 2022
Wool, plant fibers, and natural dyes

The process and subject of Mezquitas de Puerto Rico highlights the ongoing yet underrecognized migrations of people, ideas, and forms between the Arab world and the Caribbean. The buildings depicted here were first photographed by Alia Farid in various towns of Puerto Rico, after which the images were shared with weavers in Mashhad, Iran. The weavers in turn translated the images into a unique kilim, or traditional prayer rug. Without detailed instructions from Farid, the weavers interpreted these images into a tapestry while adding in their own “signatures,” like the intricate border made of ornamental pomegranates.

Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago Commission

 

Christopher Cozier (b. 1959, Port of Spain, Trinidad and Tobago; lives in Port of Spain)

Gas Men, 2014
Two-channel HD video (color, sound)
2 minutes, 7 seconds

Filmed on the shores of Lake Michigan, Christopher Cozier’s Gas Men shows two men in business suits wielding gas pump nozzles like cowboys, performing masculine stereotypes common to B-movie Westerns. Much of Cozier’s work calls attention to the cross-cultural influences and global economies that have shaped the Caribbean. In this case, the artist examines the environmental impact of extractive oil economies as well as the social conditions resulting from centuries of colonial rule, enslavement, forced labor, and more recently, post-independence political corruption in Trinidad. The sound accompanying the video, created with London-based musician Caroline Mair-Toby and Trinidad-based sitarist Sharda Patasar, features an ambulance siren, further conjuring an urban context shaped by historical migrations and violence against racialized bodies.

Courtesy of the artist

The audio for this artwork does not contain transcribable dialogue.

 

David Medalla (b. 1942, Manila, Philippines; d. 2020, Manila; lived in New York, NY, London, England, and Paris, France)

Cloud Canyons, 1963–2014
Metal, Perspex, compressors, timers, water, and soap

Cloud Canyons consists of plastic tubes that emit soap bubbles, which ooze outward and twist into biomorphic forms. The constant reconfiguration of the foam resonates with the artist’s own experience of migration from the Philippines to New York to London. The sculpture was inspired by an array of Medalla’s personal experiences ranging from the tender to the violent, such as watching his mother make ginataan (dishes cooked in coconut milk), observing the clouds over the Grand Canyon while in flight, witnessing blood frothing from the mouth of a dying guerilla fighter, and visiting a soap factory in Marseilles.

Colección Diéresis

 

Marton Robinson (b. 1979, San José, Costa Rica; lives in Toronto, Canada)

La Coronación de La Negrita, 2022
Chalkboard paint and chalk on canvas

Marton Robinson’s series El negro en Costa Rica takes its name from a book written by Carlos Meléndez and Quince Duncan, which traces the histories of the country’s Black population in Limón. In La Coronación de La Negrita, Robinson reimagines the cover of the book, incorporating several symbols and images that reference the histories of racial violence that connect the Caribbean to the United States.

Here, Robinson depicts the Virgin of the Angels, Costa Rica’s patron saint. She is holding a baby meant to resemble Cocorí, the main protagonist of an illustrated children’s book written by Joaquín Gutiérrez that features racist depictions of Black Costa Ricans. The coronation of the patron saint, Cocorí’s mother, is a reference not only to Catholic traditions but also to coronar (used, in slang terms, to mean “scoring big”), which in Costa Rica refers to making money by finding the discards of the drug trade.

Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago Commission

 

Lorraine O’Grady (b. 1934, Boston, MA; lives in New York, NY)

The Fir-Palm, 1991/2019
Archival pigment print on Hahnemühle Baryta Photo Rag pure cotton paper

In The Fir-Palm, a slanting tree emerges from the base of a Black woman’s back. This tree is a composite of two types: a New England fir and a Caribbean palm. While each of these trees is strongly associated with different geographic regions, their merger alludes to Lorraine O’Grady’s experience as the Boston-born child of West Indian immigrants from Jamaica.

Courtesy of Alexander Gray Associates, New York

 

Maksaens Denis (b. 1968, Port-au-Prince, Haiti; lives in Port-au-Prince and Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic)

Kwa Bawon, 2004
Iron structure with seven monitors
Sound composed by Laurent Lettree

References to death fill the monitors in Kwa Bawon—news footage and clippings documenting the regime of Jean-Bertrand Aristide accompany the names of journalists and civil rights advocates who went missing or were slain during this tumultuous period. The turbulence of Haitian politics bleeds into the volatility of the country’s climate, as Maksaens Denis combines scenes of Aristide’s dictatorship with abstract analog sequences and images of Hurricane Jeanne, a Category 3 storm that struck the Caribbean in September 2004. The title of the work and the cross-like configuration of the monitors alludes to Baron Samedi, the loa (spirit) of the dead and guardian of cemeteries in Haitian Voodoo (or Vodou).

To learn more about this artist, visit his website: maksaens-denis.com.

Courtesy of the artist

This artwork does not contain transcribable dialogue. The audio consists of low-frequency electronic noises, Voodoo songs, and drumbeats.

 

Daniel Lind-Ramos (b. 1953, Loíza, Puerto Rico; lives in Loíza)

Figura de Cangrejos, 2018–19
Steel, aluminum, nails, palm tree branches, dried coconuts, branches, palm tree trunks, burlap, machete, leather, ropes, sequin, awning, plastic ropes, fabric, pins, duct tape, and acrylic

Figura de Cangrejos is a human-like assemblage of everyday objects gathered in the artist’s hometown of Loíza, a Maroon-founded community on the northeastern coast of Puerto Rico. A coconut grater serves as a head and painted claw hammers and palm leaves extend outward like appendages, while elements like the drum refer more broadly to Afro-Caribbean rhythmic traditions. Daniel Lind-Ramos collected these objects through a variety of ways: scavenging them from the streets and the shore, purchasing them from local vendors, and receiving them as gifts from friends and acquaintances. These objects all function as repositories of both personal and historical memory, forming a material portrait of Loíza that reaffirms the vibrancy of Black community spaces.

Benedicta M. Badia Nordenstahl Collection

 

Suchitra Mattai (b. 1973, Georgetown, Guyana; lives in Los Angeles, CA)

An Ocean Cradle, 2022
Vintage saris, fabric, and ghungroo bells

An oceanic landscape woven together from vintage handmade saris, Suchitra Mattai’s
An Ocean Cradle alludes to movement in many ways. Collected from family and friends living throughout the South Asian diaspora, the saris not only represent travel and migration, but they also gesture toward movement across lineage. Customarily passed down from generation to generation, saris carry the memories and scents from those who wore them before.

From the 1830s to the early 1900s, waves of Indian migrants—Mattai’s ancestors included— migrated across the ocean from India to British Guiana (now Guyana) to work as indentured servants on sugar cane plantations. A significant Indo-Guyanese community remains in Guyana today.

Courtesy of the artist and Kavi Gupta

 

Rubem Valentim (b. 1922, Salvador, Brazil; d. 1991, São Paulo, Brazil; lived in Salvador and São Paulo)

Objeto Emblemático, 1977
Painted wood

The white shapes and symbols that comprise Rubem Valentim’s Objeto Emblemático are geometric simplifications of orishas—deities descended from religious traditions brought to the Americas by enslaved Yoruba communities from regions in western and central Africa. The totemic appearance of Objeto Emblemático references traditional forms of African sculpture as well as objects produced within Afro-Brazilian communities, acknowledging their profound influence on both the cultural landscape of the country and the artist himself, whose own Afro-Brazilian heritage influenced much of his work.

Candomblé and Umbanda are two religions that developed when enslaved Yoruba communities needed to preserve their own beliefs while being forced to practice Catholicism by the Portuguese colonizers in Brazil. They aligned the Yoruba orishas with Catholic saints, creating a blend of disparate religions that reflects the complexity of identity in Afro-Brazilian communities.

Courtesy of the artist, Mendes Wood DM São Paulo, Brussels, and New York, and Almeida & Dale Galeria de Arte, Brazil

 

Adán Vallecillo (b. 1977, Danlí, Honduras; lives in Tegucigalpa, Honduras)

Saturación #00, 2017
Graphite on recycled filter paper

Saturación #00 is part of Adán Vallecillo’s larger body of work involving repurposed air and oil filters sourced from auto repair shops and machinery stationed around the Panama Canal during its 2009–16 expansion. These filters trapped the pollution generated in the city as well as from the canal’s construction. Appearing on the gallery wall like a scar or vein, Saturación #00 gives form to the violent practices of US intervention in Central America and the Caribbean. By titling the work after oxygen saturation, or the level of oxygen in the blood stream, Vallecillo invokes the region itself as a body and describes extraction as a draining of life.

Courtesy of the artist

 

Freddy Rodríguez (b. 1945, Santiago de los Caballeros, Dominican Republic; d. 2022, New York, NY; lived in New York, NY)

Mulato de tal, 1974
Acrylic on canvas

In Mulato de tal, bold lines coalesce into zigzagging geometric forms that together suggest a twisting head, chest, and legs. Despite a resemblance to hard-edge painting, which aspired to a more impersonal, systematic geometry, Freddy Rodríguez’s strokes are far more gestural, leaving traces of his brush that evidence his hand’s movements. Painted in New York eleven years after Rodríguez left the Dominican Republic following dictator Rafael Trujillo’s assassination, Mulato de tal is part of a larger body of work inspired by the writings of Latin American authors on the politics of freedom and its potential. As suggested by its title, Mulato de tal responds to the racial taxonomies imposed by Trujillo’s brutal anti-Blackness campaign.

Courtesy of Hutchinson Modern & Contemporary

 

Firelei Báez (b. 1981, Santiago de los Caballeros, Dominican Republic; lives in New York, NY)

the soft afternoon air as you hold us all in a single death (To breathe full and Free: a declaration, a re-visioning, a correction), 2021
Acryl-gouache and chine collé on archival printed paper

Across this installation of eighty-one individual works, Firelei Báez describes the lives of the queen of Haiti, Marie-Louise Coidavid (1778–1851), and her daughters. Coidavid and her daughters left Haiti after the death of her husband, Henri I, and lived in exile in Pisa, Italy. Several of Báez’s other interests, including flora and fauna, the ciguapa (a female trickster in Dominican folklore), images of protest, and Yoruba mythology, are gathered across the installation’s multiple panels. By intervening directly into historical material from different time periods and geographies, Báez collapses time and space to focus on global histories of Black fugitivity and resistance.

Courtesy of the artist and James Cohan Gallery

 

Cosmo Whyte (b. 1982, St. Andrew, Jamaica; lives in Los Angeles, CA)

Beyond the Boundary, 2022
Nickel-plated steel ball chain curtain
Studio assistance: Alex Adkinson and Iris Schaer

Beyond the Boundary shows a 1984 image of Black spectators watching a cricket match between England and the West Indies. One man holds a sign that reads “Black wash,” which is a play on the cricket term “whitewash,” or when a team wins at least three matches in a row. “Blackwash” is often used in reference to the West Indies’ five consecutive wins against the English in 1984, an important event for people in the Caribbean and its diaspora.

As C. L. R. James argues, cricket has been both a real and metaphorical arena where the larger power dynamics of colonialism and anti-Blackness are played out. By transferring archival images, especially those depicting the history of Black protest and activism, onto threads of nickel-plated steel beads, Cosmo Whyte invites visitors to “breach” the curtain and feel the literal and metaphorical weight conveyed through such images.

Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago Commission

 

ABOVE

Álvaro Barrios (b. 1945, Barranquilla, Colombia; lives in Barranquilla)

El Mar de Cristóbal Colón, 1971/2022
Silkscreens, clothesline, and wooden clothespins

Comprising over one hundred silkscreen prints, Álvaro Barrios’s El Mar de Cristóbal Colón challenges the authority of the colonial map. Each side of the prints bears a single monochrome square. The pure cyan monochromes refer to the Caribbean Sea, a visual trope that has been repeatedly used to define the region, while the red monochromes surface the histories of violence that are often hidden beneath images of the Caribbean’s idyllic landscapes.

The prints are suspended from clotheslines and secured by wooden clothespins, recalling the display of literatura de cordel (cord literature) throughout northeastern Brazil. These illustrated booklets, introduced to Brazil by the Portuguese during the colonial era, were typically hung on cords in the street and intended for daily consumption by the masses.

Courtesy of the artist and Henrique Faria Fine Art, New York

 

Tavares Strachan (b. 1979, Nassau, Bahamas; lives in Nassau and New York, NY)

In Broad Daylight, 2018
Neon

Like Tavares Strachan’s other monumental neon installations, In Broad Daylight uses open-ended language to provoke moments of self-recognition and reflection. The phrase “in broad daylight” is generally invoked to describe violent or illegal acts that occur during the daytime and are visible to any within eyesight. Placed in the context of the MCA, the installation also gestures toward the violence committed against Black, Brown, and Indigenous bodies on the streets of Chicago, as well as the narratives often excluded from museums.

Courtesy of the artist and Marian Goodman Gallery

 

Teresita Fernández (b. 1968, Miami, FL; lives in New York, NY)

Rising(Lynched Land), 2020
Copper, wood, burlap, and rope

In Rising(Lynched Land), the palm tree, a symbol associated with the Caribbean’s tourist economies, is suspended from the ceiling with a rope, appearing as a lynched body. It is a painful yet powerful metaphor for the histories of colonialism, violence, and environmental pillage that connect the Caribbean landscape to the colonially oppressed body. The work takes on one of the most circulated symbols of Caribbeanness, which contrary to popular belief is not native to the region, to allude to the histories of destruction and redemption embedded within its form.

Courtesy of the artist and Lehmann Maupin, New York, Hong Kong, London, and Seoul

 

Deborah Jack (b. 1970, Rotterdam, the Netherlands; lives in St. Maarten and Jersey City, NJ)

the fecund, the lush and the salted land waits for a harvest . . . her people . . . ripe with promise, wait until the next blowing season, 2022
Seven-channel HD video projection with sound and vinyl

In this immersive, two-room installation by Deborah Jack, shots of lush orange pomegranates mix with the ocean, sky, and shoreline. Filmed by the artist around her mother’s home in St. Maarten, these images appear alongside footage of salt mining from a 1948 Dutch documentary on the island. Pomegranates and salt, both emblems of death and rebirth, share a common legacy as commodities of the colonial economy in the region. Using movement, color, and time, Jack’s installation serves as a condemnation of the destructive nature of economies based on resource extraction as well as a reclamation of the Caribbean’s visual and material cultures. Her work complicates fixed understandings of the Caribbean, offering an invitation into the myriad, shifting histories and identities held within the landscape itself.

Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago Commission

A transcript for this work is available at: mcachicago.org/forecastform. The audio consists of a woman speaking about mining salt as a youngster, string music, excerpts from a 1948 Dutch documentary on St. Maarten, and the sound of the ocean.

 

Ana Mendieta (b. 1948, Havana, Cuba; d. 1985, New York, NY; lived in Cuba, Iowa City, IA, New York, and Rome, Italy)

Untitled: Silueta Series, Mexico From Silueta Works in Mexico, 1973–1977, 1974/91
Color photograph

Collection Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago, gift from The Howard and Donna Stone Collection, 2002.46.3

 

Ana Mendieta (b. 1948, Havana, Cuba; d. 1985, New York, NY; lived in Cuba, Iowa City, IA, New York, and Rome, Italy)

Untitled: Silueta Series, Mexico From Silueta Works in Mexico, 1973–1977, 1976/91
Color photograph

Collection Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago, gift from The Howard and Donna Stone Collection, 2002.46.10

 

Ana Mendieta (b. 1948, Havana, Cuba; d. 1985, New York, NY; lived in Cuba, Iowa City, IA, New York, and Rome, Italy)

Untitled: Silueta Series, Mexico From Silueta Works in Mexico, 1973–1977, 1976/91
Color photograph

Collection Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago, gift from The Howard and Donna Stone Collection, 2002.46.4

 

Candida Alvarez (b. 1955, Brooklyn, NY; lives in Chicago, IL, and Baroda, MI)

Breast, Navel, Eye, 1993
Lithograph on Somerset soft white paper

Courtesy of the artist and Monique Meloche Gallery, Chicago

 

Christopher Cozier (b. 1959, Port of Spain, Trinidad and Tobago; lives in Port of Spain)

Dem things does bite too?, 2014–15
Ink on paper

Courtesy of the artist

 

Didier William (b. 1983, Port-au-Prince, Haiti; lives in Philadelphia, PA)

Cursed Grounds: Cursed Borders, 2021
Acrylic, oil, ink, and wood carving on panel

Private collection

 

Donna Conlon and Jonathan Harker (b. 1966, Atlanta, GA; b. 1975, Quito, Ecuador; live in Panama City, Panama)

The Voice Adrift (Voz a la deriva), 2017
HD video (color, sound)
5 minutes, 41 seconds

Courtesy of the artists and DiabloRosso, Panamá

The audio for this artwork does not contain transcribable dialogue. The audio consists of the sound of rain, flowing water, and thunder. An unintelligible whisper can also be heard whenever the water bottle is opened.

 

Donna Conlon and Jonathan Harker (b. 1966, Atlanta, GA; b. 1975, Quito, Ecuador; live in Panama City, Panama)

Tropical Zincphony (Zincfonía tropical), 2013
HD video (color, sound)
1 minute, 45 seconds

Courtesy of the artists and DiabloRosso, Panamá

The audio for this artwork does not contain transcribable dialogue. The audio consists of the sound of mangoes rolling over corrugated zinc sheets.

 

Donna Conlon and Jonathan Harker (b. 1966, Atlanta, GA; b. 1975, Quito, Ecuador; live in Panama City, Panama)

Domino Effect (Efecto dominó), 2013
HD video (color, sound)
5 minutes, 13 seconds

Courtesy of the artists and DiabloRosso, Panamá

The audio for this artwork does not contain transcribable dialogue. The audio consists of the sound of cascading bricks followed by the splash of the final brick falling into water.

 

Ebony G. Patterson (b. 1981, Kingston, Jamaica; lives in Chicago, IL, and Kingston)

. . . the wailing . . . guides us home . . . and there is a bellying on the land . . . , 2021
Mixed media on Jacquard woven photo tapestry and custom vinyl wallpaper

Courtesy of the artist and Monique Meloche Gallery, Chicago

 

Felix Gonzalez-Torres (b. 1957, Guáimaro, Cuba; d. 1996, Miami, FL; lived in New York, NY)

“Untitled”, 1995
Billboard

Courtesy of the Estate of Felix Gonzalez-Torres

 

Felix Gonzalez-Torres (b. 1957, Guáimaro, Cuba; d. 1996, Miami, FL; lived in New York, NY)

“Untitled” (Passport), 1991
Paper, endless supply

Please take only one.

Marieluise Hessel Collection, Hessel Museum of Art, Center for Curatorial Studies, Bard College, Annandale-on-Hudson, New York

 

Frank Bowling (b. 1934, Bartica, Guyana; lives in London, United Kingdom)

Bartica, 1968–69
Acrylic paint and silkscreened ink on canvas

Sheldon Inwentash and Lynn Factor, Toronto

 

Julien Creuzet (b. 1986, Le Blanc-Mesnil, France; lives in Paris, France)

it’s a sad day
in Morne à l’eau
volcano body volcano
tumor mood
blood pool
fucking sweet half moon
damn black rotten banana
today no more smile
do you like my english banana
factory,
Pesticide
in my mother’s
chest Checkmate
tropical hospital
will you heal in peace
container ship
in the middle of the cluster
cluster body bark
terror will you transport my
Ocean
racher, tout du dedans bien pris
en dedans
racher, tout tout tou pris dans
le dedans (Papua New Guinea)
, 2021
Laser-cut steel

Courtesy of the artist and DOCUMENT, Chicago, IL

 

Julien Creuzet (b. 1986, Le Blanc-Mesnil, France; lives in Paris, France)

it’s a sad day
in Morne à l’eau
volcano body volcano
tumor mood
blood pool
fucking sweet half moon
damn black rotten banana
today no more smile
do you like my english banana
factory,
Pesticide
in my mother’s
chest Checkmate
tropical hospital
will you heal in peace
container ship
in the middle of the cluster
cluster body bark
terror will you transport my
Ocean
racher, tout du dedans bien pris
en dedans
racher, tout tout tou pris
dans le dedans (Virginia)
, 2021
Laser-cut steel

Courtesy of the artist and DOCUMENT, Chicago, IL

 

Julien Creuzet (b. 1986, Le Blanc-Mesnil, France; lives in Paris, France)

Crossroads, 2022
HD video (color, sound)
7 minutes, 35 seconds

Courtesy of the artist and DOCUMENT, Chicago, IL

The audio in this artwork consists of music produced by the artist and someone reciting spoken word in Martinican Creole.

 

Keith Piper (b. 1960, Malta; lives in London, England)

Trade Winds, 1992
Video, audio, and timber crates

Courtesy of the artist
The audio in this artwork consists of howling winds as well as excerpts from Burning Spear’s song “Columbus” and the 1984 documentary Africa: A Voyage of Discovery. A transcript for this work is available at: mcachicago.org/forecastform.

 

Lorraine O’Grady (b. 1934, Boston, MA; lives in New York, NY)

The Strange Taxi: From Africa to Jamaica to Boston in 200 Years, 1991/2019
Archival pigment print on Hahnemühle Baryta Photo Rag pure cotton paper

Courtesy of Alexander Gray Associates, New York

 

Peter Doig (b. 1959, Edinburgh, Scotland; lives in London, England, and Port of Spain, Trinidad and Tobago)

Black Curtain (Towards Monkey Island), 2004
Oil on linen

Mima and César Reyes Collection

 

ABOVE

Rafael Ferrer (b. 1933, San Juan, Puerto Rico; lives in Long Island, NY)

Ciclón en el Mar de la China, 1977
Oil and enamel on steel, wire, and wood

Collection Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago, gift of Earl and Betsy Millard, 1991.35.a–b

 

Tomm El-Saieh (b. 1984, Port-au-Prince, Haiti; lives in Miami, FL)

Cursive Grid, 2017–18
Acrylic on canvas

Collection of Nancy and David Frej

 

Zilia Sánchez (b. 1926, Havana, Cuba; lives in San Juan, Puerto Rico)

Lunar con tatuaje, c. 1968–69
Acrylic and ink on canvas

Zilia Sánchez sculpts forms that suggest both a body and a landscape. As a set of concentric circles, Lunar con tatuaje recalls a breast and a nipple as well as the shape of the moon. With her eyes closed, Sánchez intuitively sketched a composition of meandering lines across the canvas’s surface—a tattooing technique the artist calls la furia (the fury). They trace the artist’s migration in the aftermath of the Cuban Revolution from Havana to Madrid to New York to San Juan.

The Museum of Fine Arts, Houston; museum purchase funded by the 2022 Latin American Experience Gala and Auction, 2022.183

 

Joscelyn Gardner (b. 1961, Barbados; lives in Ontario, Canada)

Coffea Arabica (Clarissa) from Creole Portraits III: “bringing down the flowers . . .”, 2011

Manihot flabellifolia (Old Catalina) from Creole Portraits III: “bringing down the flowers . . .”, 2011

Convolvulus jalapa (Yara) from Creole Portraits III: “bringing down the flowers . . .”, 2010

Poinciana pulcherrima (Lilith) from Creole Portraits III: “bringing down the flowers . . .”, 2009

Veronica frutescens (Mazerine) from Creole Portraits III: “bringing down the flowers . . .”, 2009

All works hand-colored lithograph on frosted Mylar

These five works are part of Joscelyn Gardner’s Creole Portraits III: “bringing down the flowers . . .”, a series of thirteen portraits of enslaved Afro-Caribbean women. Here, each woman is represented by a unique entanglement of braided hair, a slave collar, and a plant capable of inducing abortion.

Creole Portraits III responds to the diaries of eighteenth-century English plantation overseer Thomas Thistlewood. In his diaries, Thistlewood detailed the thousands of acts of sexual assault, rape, and other forms of torture he committed against enslaved peoples at the Egypt Plantation in Westmoreland, Jamaica. Each titled after a natural abortifacient and the name of an enslaved woman mentioned in Thistlewood’s diaries, Gardner’s portraits contend with a history of resistance that went unremarked by Thistlewood but that nevertheless persisted: how enslaved women consumed plants to end unwanted pregnancies and exert control over their own bodies.

Colección Chocolate Cortés

Introducción a la exhibición

La década de 1990 fue una de profundas transformaciones sociales y políticas, cuando los debates en torno a la identidad y la diferencia ocuparon un lugar destacado. Forecast Form: Art in the Caribbean Diaspora, 1990s–Today toma la década de 1990 como su escenario cultural, reuniendo las obras de treinta y siete artistas o bien quienes viven en el Caribe o provienen de una herencia caribeña, o bien cuyas obras están conectadas a la región. La exhibición está anclada en el concepto de la diáspora, o sea, la dispersión de las personas a través de la migración tanto forzada como voluntaria. Aquí, la diáspora no es un anhelo de regresar a casa sino una manera de comprender que siempre estamos en movimiento y que nuestras identidades están en estados de transformación constantemente. Esta idea se capta en las obras de arte exhibidas, las cuales sugieren el movimiento y el viaje a través de formas, materiales y técnicas.

Forecast Form también propone que el Caribe es una manera de pensar, ser y hacer, la cual se extiende más allá de sus fronteras geográficas, desafiando nuestras suposiciones sobre la cultura caribeña y su representación y redefiniendo la relación entre la identidad y el lugar. La exhibición también presenta una idea a través de su título: que el Caribe inauguró al mundo moderno, y que las formas y sus estéticas nos permiten analizar las historias y las fuerzas que siguen moldeando nuestro momento contemporáneo, desde la emancipación y los derechos humanos hasta el colonialismo y el cambio climático.

Forecast Form es comisariada por Carla Acevedo-Yates, Curadora titular de Marilyn y Larry Fields, con Iris Colburn, Asistente curatorial, Isabel Casso, Becaria previa del programa curatorial Susman, y Nolan Jimbo, Becario del programa curatorial Susman. La exhibición es diseñada por SKETCH | Johann Wolfschoon, Panamá.

Secciones de exhibición

TERRITORIOS

El cuerpo es nuestra primera vivienda y el portador de nuestras historias personales y colectivas. La artista Zilia Sánchez, cuyas obras están en esta sala, declara: “Soy isla,” reconsiderando su propio cuerpo e identidad a través de un lugar.

Aunque la palabra “territorio” se entiende mayormente como un concepto político, como las naciones y las fronteras fijas, también es una forma de describir los panoramas psíquicos, o sea los mundos interiores, los cuales informan nuestras experiencias comunes. A pesar de que la diáspora comienza siendo el movimiento físico de las personas, los resultados de su proceso son nuevos territorios personales, culturales e históricos. Los artistas en esta sección examinan estos territorios movedizos mediante procesos que utilizan la transferencia, las capas y la disimulación. Algunos de los artistas toman el cuerpo como un punto de partida para señalar el paso del tiempo y el espacio a través del movimiento, mientras que otros crean paisajes abstractos, tanto reales como imaginados.

RITMOS FORMALES

Todas las obras presentadas aquí sugieren el movimiento—no solo plasmando o capturando los cuerpos en pleno movimiento sino también resaltando el movimiento a través de las decisiones formales, los materiales y las técnicas. Algunos de los artistas en esta sección expresan el dinamismo y la energía del movimiento utilizando el color y los gestos mientras oscilan entre las formas reconocibles y las abstractas. Otros de ellos incluyen el movimiento en sus procesos de crear obras de arte, transfiriendo los materiales de un lugar o una superficie a otro/a. Cada una de estas estrategias artísticas consta de una metáfora de cómo las identidades se forman mediante la transformación constante.

INTERCAMBIO

¿Cómo es que la creación de obras de arte refleja los intercambios interculturales? ¿Cómo las formas logran emigrar y crear nuevos entendimientos de nuestro mundo entrelazado?

Históricamente, el Caribe ha sido un lugar para el intercambio cultural y la explotación económica, desde las plantaciones de la época colonial hasta las industrias del turismo y del petróleo que sustentan la economía mundial de hoy en día. En cuanto a la cultura, el Caribe sigue en un proceso de reconfiguración constante a través de la migración y las relaciones geopolíticas con el mundo árabe, Asia y las Américas, entre otras regiones. En las obras de esta sección, el lugar es difícil de localizar, ya que las geografías se entremezclan entre sí y las imágenes ponen en duda los orígenes y las identidades fijos/as.

CREACIÓN DE IMÁGENES

Crear imágenes y readaptar imágenes archivadas son maneras importantes de formar y preservar la memoria. Tanto la fotografía como el vídeo de archivo sirven para este propósito y los artistas los utilizan a menudo como los materiales de partida para crear obras que cuestionan las narrativas históricas dominantes. En esta sala, los artistas o bien utilizan fotografías y vídeos existentes o bien crean sus propias imágenes para examinar la historia del activismo negro, de las categorías raciales y en la formación de la identidad en distintos lugares—desde Gran Bretaña a Costa Rica, a los Estados Unidos, Jamaica y Haití.

PAISAJE

¿Qué cosas oculta el paisaje? La belleza exuberante, multicolor y abundante del paisaje tropical suele reprimir frecuentemente historias dolorosas y violentas. En lugar de transmitir estas historias en modos narrativos, los artistas presentados en esta sección emplean diversas técnicas—a menudo plasmando la flora de un lugar, incluyendo los árboles y las plantas, además de los jardines—para referir a las historias del colonialismo, la migración y la extracción de recursos.

RASTROS

Las personas y los lugares se desarrollan según el paso del tiempo, dejando rastros tanto visibles como invisibles. ¿Cuáles rastros quedan de las historias coloniales, grabados en la memoria de los cuerpos, los lugares y los objetos?

El Caribe, como una región geográfica, se desarrolló a través del movimiento de los cuerpos clasificados según su género y su raza, primero con los esclavizados de África degradados al nivel de los bienes muebles y después con los trabajadores de la India, China y otros lugares con un contrato de servidumbre. Los legados del colonialismo, el racismo y la violencia de género hieren tanto al cuerpo como al paisaje. En vez de plasmar estas historias coloniales, los artistas en esta sección llaman la atención a los rastros que estas dejaron a través de los objetos, los materiales y los gestos, los cuales contienen tanto del pasado como del presente y del futuro.

Cartelas

Engel Leonardo (n. 1977, Baní, República Dominicana; vive en Santo Domingo, República Dominicana)

Jimayaco, 2017
Arcilla, esmalte, madera guayacán y oro aluvial

Esta instalación escultórica es parcialmente inspirada por los recuerdos de Engel Leonardo de ver a las mujeres buscar el oro en los ríos de Jimayaco, un pueblo de la provincia central de la República Dominicana, La Vega. Montados al tope de dos de las esculturas hay unos recipientes parecidos a los que se usan para extraer el oro que el artista ha llenado de arcilla, agua y pedazos de oro, evocando así aun más un modo de vida campestre que se ha ido desapareciendo rápidamente. Las esculturas también se inspiran por las Muñecas sin rostro, las muñecas artesanales sin cara que surgieron como recuerdos turísticos en la República Dominicana durante la década de 1980 y desde entonces se han convertido en un marcador reconocible de la dominicanidad. Al contrastar los tonos oscuros de la madera guayacán con los cuerpos de las figuras de color claro y esmaltados, Leonardo comenta sobre cómo las construcciones de la identidad dominicana han sido influenciadas por el rechazo de la negritud en la República Dominicana, apoyado por los legados del colonialismo y de la dictadura de Rafael Trujillo.

Colección privada

 

Félix González-Torres (n. 1957, Guáimaro, Cuba; f. 1996, Miami, FL; vivió en Nueva York, NY)

“Untitled” (North), 1993
Bombillas, portalámparas de porcelana y cables eléctricos

“Juega con ello, por favor. Diviértete. Date esa libertad.” Estas son algunas de las reflexiones de Félix González-Torres sobre el protocolo de instalación abierta de las veinticuatro obras de cuerdas de luces que él realizó entre 1992 y 1994, entre ellas “Untitled” (North).

Aunque el significado de estas obras también está abierto a interpretación, el (North) en el título ofrece una manera de entender esta obra de arte. La curadora Nancy Spector propone que el título hace referencia al dicho cubano “el norte,” una descripción breve para todo lo que esté al norte de la isla. Interpretada así, la obra de arte—presentada aquí como una cortina de luz—imagina al “norte” como una geografía cambiante y un ideal esquivo.

Marieluise Hessel Collection, Hessel Museum of Art, Center for Curatorial Studies, Bard College, Annandale-on-Hudson, Nueva York

 

Sandra Brewster (n. 1973, Toronto, Canadá; vive en Toronto)

Wilson Harris: “even in my dream, the ground I knew I must not relinquish”, 2022
Transferencia de fotografía a la pared con gel

Wilson Harris: “even in my dream, the ground I knew I must not relinquish” es un retrato monumental del prolífico escritor nacido en Guyana, Wilson Harris. Para realizar esta obra de arte, Sandra Brewster primero imprimió imágenes individuales de Harris en varios papeles y las bañó en un medio gel, tras lo cual las presionó sobre la pared del museo. Superpuestas unas a otras, las capas de imágenes transmiten el propio estilo de escritura de Harris sin rigidez y no lineal. El proceso de la transferencia de las imágenes, que además incluye restregando la pared con fuerza para eliminar el papel y el pegamento, deja lo que Brewster le llama “pliegues y desgarros,” unas metáforas visibles de lo que se pierde y se gana mediante la migración. Después de que esta exhibición termine, el retrato de Harris, aun cuando lijado e invisible a los ojos, permanecerá incrustado en la pared, un recordatorio conmovedor de las historias en el fondo de las instituciones culturales.

Comisión de Museo de arte contemporáneo Chicago

 

Denzil Forrester (n. 1956, Granada; vive en Cornualles, Reino Unido)

Night Strobe, 1985
Óleo sobre lienzo

A finales de la década de 1970 y en los 80s, fue dentro de las oscuras discotecas de Londres llenas de humo que Denzil Forrester esbozó sus escenas sobre una pila de papel, grabando las energías, las luces y los movimientos de estas discotecas. Trabajando rápidamente—cada dibujo le tomaba terminarlo no más de lo que duraba una sola canción—Forrester completaba más de cuarenta dibujos cada noche. Forrester convirtió algunos de estos dibujos en pinturas dinámicas, tal como Night Strobe. Bajo la sombra de la Bretaña racista y xenófoba de Margaret Thatcher, la discoteca, con rastros del carnaval y resonando con la música dub, blues, reggae y dancehall, era un espacio crucial para el sentido de pertenencia.

The Rachofsky Collection

 

Alia Farid (n. 1985, Kuwait City, Kuwait; vive en Kuwait City y San Juan, Puerto Rico)

Mezquitas de Puerto Rico, 2022
Lana, fibras de plantas y tintes naturales

El proceso y el tema de Mezquitas de Puerto Rico destaca la actual pero poco reconocida migración de las personas, las ideas y las formas entre el mundo árabe y el Caribe. Los edificios plasmados aquí primero fueron fotografiados por Alia Farid en varios pueblos de Puerto Rico, tras lo cual las imágenes fueron compartidas con tejedores en Mashhad, Irán. Los tejedores a su vez convirtieron las imágenes a un kilim único, o sea, una alfombra de oración tradicional. Sin tener unas instrucciones detalladas de Farid, los tejedores interpretaron estas imágenes por medio de un tapiz, a la vez añadiéndole sus propias características distintivas, como el borde intrincado hecho de granadas ornamentales.

Comisión de Museo de arte contemporáneo Chicago

 

Christopher Cozier (n. 1959, Puerto España, Trinidad y Tobago; vive en Puerto España)

Gas Men, 2014
Vídeo de alta definición (HD) de dos canales (color, sonido)
2 minutos, 7 segundos

Filmado a orillas del lago Michigan, el vídeo Gas Men de Christopher Cozier muestra a dos hombres vestidos en trajes de negocios gesticulando como si fueran vaqueros con unas bombas de gasolina, imitando los estereotipos masculinos típicamente vistos en las películas Westerns (del antiguo oeste) de bajo presupuesto. Una gran parte de las obras de Cozier llama la atención a las influencias transculturales y a las economías globales que han moldeado al Caribe. En este caso, el artista examina el impacto medioambiental de las economías de extraer el petróleo, además de las condiciones sociales que han resultado tras siglos del dominio colonial, la esclavitud, la labor forzada y la recién corrupción política en Trinidad post-independencia. El sonido que acompaña al vídeo, creado con la compositora Caroline Mair-Toby de Londres y la sitarista Sharda Patasar de Trinidad, incluye la sirena de una ambulancia, lo que evoca aun más un contexto urbano formado por las migraciones históricas y la violencia contra los cuerpos racializados.

Por cortesía del artista

El audio de esta obra de arte no contiene un diálogo que se pueda transcribir.

 

David Medalla (n. 1942, Manila, Filipinas; f. 2020, Manila; vivió en Nueva York, NY, Londres, Inglaterra, y París, Francia)

Cloud Canyons, 1963–2014
Metal, Perspex, compresores, cronómetros, agua y jabón

Cloud Canyons consiste en unos tubos plásticos que emiten burbujas de jabón, las cuales se supuren hacia afuera y se retuercen en unas formas biomórficas. La constante reconfiguración de la espuma refleja la propia experiencia del artista al emigrar de las Filipinas a Nueva York a Londres. Medalla fue inspirado a crear la escultura por varias experiencias personales que contrastan de un extremo tierno a otro violento, como ver a su madre preparar ginataan (recetas con una base de leche de coco), observar las nubes sobre el Gran Cañón en pleno vuelo, ver de primera mano la sangre brotando de la boca de un guerrillero moribundo y visitar una fábrica de jabón en Marsella.

Colección Diéresis

 

Marton Robinson (n. 1979, San José, Costa Rica; vive en Toronto, Canadá)

La Coronación de La Negrita, 2022
Pintura de pizarra y tiza sobre lienzo

La serie de Marton Robinson El negro en Costa Rica toma su nombre de un libro escrito por Carlos Meléndez y Quince Duncan que traza las historias de la población negra del país en la ciudad de Limón. En La Coronación de La Negrita, Robinson reimagina la portada del libro, incorporando varios símbolos e imágenes que recuerdan a las historias de la violencia racial que conectan el Caribe a los Estados Unidos.

Aquí, Robinson representa la Virgen de los Ángeles, la santa patrona de Costa Rica. Ella aguanta un bebé que representa a Cocorí, el protagonista principal de un libro infantil ilustrado de Joaquín Gutiérrez que presenta representaciones racistas de los costarricenses negros. La coronación de la santa patrona, la madre de Cocorí, se refiere no solo a las tradiciones católicas sino también a “coronar” que, en Costa Rica, se refiere a ganar dinero al encontrar los descartes del narcotráfico.

Comisión de Museo de arte contemporáneo Chicago

 

Lorraine O’Grady (n. 1934, Boston, MA; vive en Nueva York, NY)

The Fir-Palm, 1991/2019
Impresión con pigmento de imagen de archivo sobre papel Hahnemühle Baryta Photo Rag de algodón puro

En The Fir-Palm, un árbol torcido aflora de la base de la espalda de una mujer negra. Este árbol es una combinación de dos tipos: un abeto de Nueva Inglaterra y una palma del Caribe. Aunque cada uno de estos árboles está fuertemente asociado con diferentes regiones geográficas, su fusión alude a la experiencia de Lorraine O’Grady siendo la hija nacida en Boston de inmigrantes jamaiquinos con orígenes en las Indias Occidentales.

Por cortesía de Alexander Gray Associates, Nueva York

 

Maksaens Denis (n. 1968, Puerto Príncipe, Haití; vive en Puerto Príncipe y Santo Domingo, República Dominicana)

Kwa Bawon, 2004
Estructura de hierro con siete monitores
Sonido compuesto por Laurent Lettree

Las referencias a la muerte llenan los monitores en Kwa Bawon—las imágenes y los recortes de las noticias que documentaron el régimen de Jean-Bertrand Aristide acompañan a los nombres de los periodistas y los defensores de los derechos civiles quienes desaparecieron o fueron asesinados durante esta época tumultuosa. La turbulencia de la política haitiana se difunde a la volatilidad del clima del país, así como Maksaens Denis combina escenas de la dictadura de Aristide con secuencias analógicas abstractas e imágenes del huracán Jeanne, un ciclón de categoría 3 que le cayó encima al Caribe en septiembre de 2004. El título de la obra de arte y la configuración de los monitores en forma de un crucifijo aluden a Barón Samedi, el loa (espíritu) de los muertos y el guardián de los cementerios, según el vudú haitiano.

Para saber más acerca de este artista, visita su sitio web: maksaens-denis.com

Por cortesía del artista

Esta obra de arte no contiene un diálogo que se pueda transcribir. El audio consiste en unos ruidos electrónicos de baja frecuencia, unas canciones de vudú y los sonidos de tambores.

 

Daniel Lind-Ramos (n. 1953, Loíza, Puerto Rico; vive en Loíza)

Figura de Cangrejos, 2018–19
Acero, aluminio, clavos, ramas de palma, cocos secos, ramas, troncos de palma, arpillera, machete, piel, sogas, lentejuela, toldo, cuerdas de plástico, tela, alfileres, cinta adhesiva para tubería y pintura acrílica

Figura de Cangrejos es un ensamblaje de objetos de uso diario montados en forma humana, recogidos en el pueblo de Loíza donde vive el artista, que consta de una comunidad de origen cimarrón en la costa noreste de Puerto Rico. Un rallador de coco sirve de cabeza y unos martillos y unas hojas de palma pintadas se extienden hacia fuera como unos apéndices, mientras que elementos como el tambor se refieren a las tradiciones rítmicas afrocaribeñas. Daniel Lind-Ramos recolectó estos objetos de distintas maneras: recogiéndolos por las calles y en la costa, comprándolos de vendedores locales y recibiéndolos como regalos de sus amigos y gente conocida. Todos estos objetos funcionan como repositorios, tanto de la memoria personal como de la histórica, así formando un retrato material de Loíza que reafirma la vitalidad de los espacios de la comunidad negra.

Benedicta M. Badia Nordenstahl Collection

 

Suchitra Mattai (n. 1973, Georgetown, Guyana; vive en Los Ángeles, CA)

An Ocean Cradle, 2022
Saris vintage, tela y campanas para ghungroo

Un paisaje oceánico formado por saris tejidos vintage hechos a mano, An Ocean Cradle de Suchitra Mattai alude al movimiento de varias maneras. Recolectados de sus familiares y de amigos que forman parte de la diáspora del sur de Asia, los saris no solo señalan el viajar y la migración, sino que también indican un movimiento a lo largo del linaje. Tradicionalmente legados de generación en generación, los saris conservan los recuerdos y los aromas de quienes se los llevaron puestos anteriormente.

Desde alrededor de 1830 hasta la primera década de 1900, varias olas de migrantes indios—entre ellos los antepasados de Mattai—emigraron cruzando el océano desde la India hasta la Guyana Británica (Guyana hoy en día) para laborar en las plantaciones de caña de azúcar bajo un contrato de servidumbre. Todavía existe una numerosa comunidad indo-guyanés en la Guyana de hoy en día.

Por cortesía de la artista y Kavi Gupta

 

Rubem Valentim (n. 1922, Salvador, Brasil; f. 1991, São Paulo, Brasil; vivió en Salvador y São Paulo)

Objeto Emblemático, 1977
Madera pintada

Las formas y los símbolos blancos que figuran en Objeto Emblemático de Rubem Valentim son simplificaciones geométricas de los orishas—las deidades que provienen de las tradiciones religiosas que las comunidades esclavizadas de yoruba trajeron a las Américas desde las regiones occidentales y centrales de África. El aspecto totémico de Objeto Emblemático alude a los estilos tradicionales de la escultura africana así como a los objetos producidos por las comunidades afrobrasileñas, reconociendo su influencia profunda tanto sobre el paisaje cultural del país como sobre el propio artista, cuyo legado afrobrasileño tuvo una influencia sobre muchas de sus obras de arte.

El candomblé y la umbanda son dos religiones que se desarrollaron cuando las comunidades esclavizadas de yoruba necesitaban preservar sus propias creencias mientras fueron obligadas a practicar el catolicismo por los colonizadores portugueses en Brasil. Ellos alinearon los orishas yorubas con los santos católicos, creando así una mezcla entre unas religiones dispares, la cual refleja lo complejo que es la identidad dentro de las comunidades afrobrasileñas.

Por cortesía del artista, de Mendes Wood DM São Paulo, Bruselas y Nueva York y de la Almeida & Dale Galeria de Arte, Brasil

 

Adán Vallecillo (n. 1977, Danlí, Honduras; vive en Tegucigalpa, Honduras)

Saturación #00, 2017
Grafito sobre papel de filtro reciclado

Saturación #00 forma parte de un conjunto más grande de obras de arte de Adán Vallecillo basadas en reutilizar los filtros de aire y de aceite recogidos de los mecánicos de automóviles y de la maquinaria estacionada por alrededor del Canal de Panamá durante su ampliación de 2009–16. Estos filtros atraparon la contaminación generada por la ciudad y además por la construcción del canal. Presentada sobre la pared de la sala como una cicatriz o una vena, Saturación #00 da forma a las prácticas violentas del intervencionismo estadounidense en Centroamérica y el Caribe. Al escoger un título evocador de la saturación de oxígeno, o sea, el nivel de oxígeno en el torrente sanguíneo, Vallecillo invoca el sentido de que la misma región es como un cuerpo y describe la extracción como un drenaje de la vida en sí.

Por cortesía del artista

 

Freddy Rodríguez (n. 1945, Santiago de los Treinta Caballeros, República Dominicana; f. 2022, Nueva York, NY; vivió en Nueva York)

Mulato de tal, 1974
Acrílico sobre lienzo

En Mulato de tal, unas líneas pronunciadas se unen para crear unas formas geométricas que zigzaguean de manera que juntas parecen ser una cabeza, un pecho y unas piernas que están girando. A pesar de tener un parecido al estilo de hard-edge painting (pintar con líneas precisas), la cual aspiraba a una geometría más impersonal y sistemática, la pincelada de Freddy Rodríguez es mucho más gestual, dejando unos rastros de su pincel que dan prueba de los movimientos de su mano. Pintada en Nueva York once años después de que Rodríguez se fue de la República Dominicana tras el asesinato del dictador Rafael Trujillo, Mulato de tal es una del conjunto de sus obras de arte inspiradas por los escritos de autores latinoamericanos sobre la política de la libertad y su potencial. Como sugiere su título, Mulato de tal responde a las taxonomías raciales impuestas por la brutal campaña anti-negra de Trujillo.

Por cortesía de Hutchinson Modern & Contemporary

 

Firelei Báez (n. 1981, Santiago de los Caballeros, República Dominicana; vive en Nueva York, NY)

the soft afternoon air as you hold us all in a single death (To breathe full and Free: a declaration, a re-visioning, a correction), 2021
Acryl-gouache y chine collé sobre papel con una impresión de imagen de archivo

A través de esta instalación de ochenta y una obras de arte individuales, Firelei Báez describe las vidas de la reina de Haití, María-Luisa Coidavid (1778–1851), y de sus hijas. Coidavid y sus hijas huyeron de Haití tras la muerte de su marido, Enrique I, y vivieron exiliadas en Pisa, Italia. Varios otros de los intereses de Báez, como la flora y la fauna, la “ciguapa” (una embaucadora en el folclore dominicano), las imágenes de la protesta y la mitología yoruba, figuran en los múltiples paneles de la instalación. Al intervenir directamente en los materiales históricos de diferentes épocas y geografías, Báez colapsa el tiempo y el espacio para enfocar en las historias mundiales de la fugacidad y la resistencia de la población negra.

Por cortesía de la artista y James Cohan Gallery

 

Cosmo Whyte (n. 1982, San Andrés, Jamaica; vive en Los Ángeles, CA)

Beyond the Boundary, 2022
Cortina de cadena de bolas de acero niqueladas
Asistencia en el estudio: Alex Adkinson e Iris Schaer

Beyond the Boundary presenta una imagen de 1984 con espectadores negros viendo un partido de críquet entre Inglaterra y las Indias Occidentales. Un hombre aguanta un cartel que dice Black wash, lo cual es un juego de palabras con el término de críquet whitewash, o sea, cuando un equipo gana una serie de al menos tres partidos seguidos. Se utiliza a menudo para referir a las cinco victorias consecutivas de las Indias Occidentales sobre los ingleses en 1984, un acontecimiento importante para la gente del Caribe y su diáspora. Como afirma C. L. R. James, el críquet ha sido una arena tanto real como metafórica en la cual se desarrollan las dinámicas mayores del poder del colonialismo y de la anti-negritud. Al transferir las imágenes de archivo, especialmente las que plasman la historia de la protesta y el activismo de la población negra, sobre hilos de perlas de acero niqueladas, Cosmo Whyte invita a los visitantes a “atravesar” la cortina y a sentir el peso literal y metafórico que transmiten estos tipos de imágenes.

Comisión de Museo de arte contemporáneo Chicago

 

Álvaro Barrios (n. 1945, Barranquilla, Colombia; vive en Barranquilla)

El Mar de Cristóbal Colón, 1971/2022
Serigrafías, tendedero y colgadores de madera

Al presentar más de cien impresiones de serigrafía, El Mar de Cristóbal Colón de Álvaro Barrios desafía la autoridad del mapa colonial. Cada cara de las impresiones lleva un solo cuadro monocromático. Los monocromos de color puro cian refieren al Mar Caribe, un tropo visual que se ha utilizado repetidamente para definir la región, mientras que los monocromos rojos desvelan las historias de violencia que frecuentemente están ocultas tras las imágenes de los paisajes idílicos del Caribe.

Las impresiones están colgando de unos tendederos y están fijadas con colgadores de madera, rememorando la exhibición de “literatura de cordel” por todo el noreste de Brasil. Estos folletos ilustrados, introducidos a Brasil por los portugueses durante la época colonial, solían colgarse en cordones por las calles para el consumo diario de la población.

Por cortesía del artista y Henrique Faria Fine Art, Nueva York

 

Tavares Strachan (n. 1979, Nassau, Bahamas; vive en Nassau y Nueva York, NY)

In Broad Daylight, 2018
Neón

Al igual que las otras instalaciones de neón monumentales de Tavares Strachan, In Broad Daylight utiliza un lenguaje abierto para provocar momentos de autorreconocimiento y reflexión. La frase “a plena luz del día” se suele invocar para describir a los actos violentos o ilegales que ocurren durante el día y a la vista de cualquiera. Situada en el contexto del MCA, la instalación también hace un gesto hacia la violencia cometida contra los cuerpos negros, morenos e indígenas por las calles de Chicago, así como hacia las narrativas que suelen ser excluidas de los museos.

Por cortesía del artista y la Marian Goodman Gallery

 

Teresita Fernández (n. 1968, Miami, FL; vive en Nueva York, NY)

Rising(Lynched Land), 2020
Cobre, madera, arpillera y soga

En Rising(Lynched Land), la palma, un símbolo que se asocia con las economías turísticas del Caribe, está colgando del techo con una cuerda, apareciendo como un cadáver linchado. Es una metáfora dolorosa pero impactante de las historias del colonialismo, la violencia y el saqueo medioambiental que conecta el paisaje caribeño al cuerpo oprimido por el colonialismo. La obra de arte figura uno de los símbolos más difundidos del Caribe, que contrario a la creencia popular no es originario de la región, a fin de aludir a las historias de destrucción y redención que están integradas en su forma.

Por cortesía de la artista y Lehmann Maupin, Nueva York, Hong Kong, Londres y Seúl

 

Deborah Jack (n. 1970, Róterdam, Países Bajos; vive en San Martín y Jersey City, NJ)

the fecund, the lush and the salted land waits for a harvest . . . her people . . . ripe with promise, wait until the next blowing season, 2022
Proyección de vídeo de alta definición (HD) de siete canales con sonido y vinilo

En esta instalación inmersiva de dos salas realizada por Deborah Jack, unas imágenes de exuberantes granadas de color naranja se mezclan con el océano, el cielo y la costa. Filmadas por la artista en los alrededores de la casa de su madre en San Martín, estas imágenes aparecen junto con unas imágenes de minas de sal de un documental holandés de 1948 sobre la isla. Las granadas y la sal, ambos emblemas de la muerte y el renacimiento, comparten un legado común como productos de la economía colonial en la región. Utilizando el movimiento, el color y el tiempo, la instalación de Jack condena las características destructivas de las economías basadas en la extracción de recursos y además reclama las culturas visuales y materiales del Caribe. Su obra complica las interpretaciones fijas del Caribe, ofreciendo una invitación a la multitud de historias e identidades cambiantes que el propio paisaje alberga.

Comisión de Museo de arte contemporáneo Chicago
El audio consiste en una mujer que habla sobre extraer sal de joven, música de cuerda, unos extractos de un documental holandés de 1948 sobre San Martín y el sonido del océano. Una transcripción para esta obra de arte está disponible en: mcachicago.org/forecastform.

 

Ana Mendieta (n. 1948, La Habana, Cuba; f. 1985, Nueva York, NY; vivió en Cuba, Iowa City, IA, Nueva York y Roma, Italia)

Untitled: Silueta Series, Mexico From Silueta Works in Mexico, 1973–1977, 1974/91
Fotografía en color

Colección Museo de arte contemporáneo Chicago, donación de The Howard and Donna Stone Collection, 2002.46.3

 

Ana Mendieta (n. 1948, La Habana, Cuba; f. 1985, Nueva York, NY; vivió en Cuba, Iowa City, IA, Nueva York y Roma, Italia)

Untitled: Silueta Series, Mexico From Silueta Works in Mexico, 1973–1977, 1976/91
Fotografía en color

Colección Museo de arte contemporáneo Chicago, donación de The Howard and Donna Stone Collection, 2002.46.10

 

Ana Mendieta (n. 1948, La Habana, Cuba; f. 1985, Nueva York, NY; vivió en Cuba, Iowa City, IA, Nueva York y Roma, Italia)

Untitled: Silueta Series, Mexico From Silueta Works in Mexico, 1973–1977, 1976/91
Fotografía en color

Colección Museo de arte contemporáneo Chicago, donación de The Howard and Donna Stone Collection, 2002.46.4

 

Candida Alvarez (n. 1955, Brooklyn, NY; vive en Chicago, IL, y Baroda, MI)

Breast, Navel, Eye, 1993
Litografía sobre papel blanco suave Somerset

Por cortesía de la artista y la Monique Meloche Gallery, Chicago

 

Christopher Cozier (n. 1959, Puerto España, Trinidad y Tobago; vive en Puerto España)

Dem things does bite too?, 2014–15
Tinta sobre papel

Por cortesía del artista

 

Didier William (n. 1983, Puerto Príncipe, Haití; vive en Filadelfia, PA)

Cursed Grounds: Cursed Borders, 2021
Acrílico, óleo, tinta y tallado de madera sobre panel

Colección privada

 

Donna Conlon y Jonathan Harker (n. 1966, Atlanta, GA; n. 1975, Quito, Ecuador; viven en Ciudad de Panamá, Panamá)

The Voice Adrift (Voz a la deriva), 2017
Vídeo de alta definición (HD) (color, sonido)
5 minutos, 41 segundos

Por cortesía de los artistas y DiabloRosso, Panamá

El audio de esta obra de arte no contiene un diálogo que se pueda transcribir. El audio consiste en los sonidos de la lluvia, agua fluyente y truenos. También se puede escuchar un susurro ininteligible cuando se abre la botella de agua.

 

Donna Conlon y Jonathan Harker (n. 1966, Atlanta, GA; n. 1975, Quito, Ecuador; viven en Ciudad de Panamá, Panamá)

Tropical Zincphony (Zincfonía tropical), 2013
Vídeo de alta definición (HD) (color, sonido)
1 minuto, 45 segundos

Por cortesía de los artistas y DiabloRosso, Panamá

El audio de esta obra de arte no contiene un diálogo que se pueda transcribir. El audio consiste en el sonido de unos mangos rodando sobre una chapa de zinc corrugada.

 

Donna Conlon y Jonathan Harker (n. 1966, Atlanta, GA; n. 1975, Quito, Ecuador; viven en Ciudad de Panamá, Panamá)

Domino Effect (Efecto dominó), 2013
Vídeo de alta definición (HD) (color, sonido)
5 minutos, 13 segundos

Por cortesía de los artistas y DiabloRosso, Panamá

El audio de esta obra de arte no contiene un diálogo que se pueda transcribir. El audio consiste en el sonido de unos ladrillos cayendo en cascada seguido por el chapoteo del último ladrillo al caer al agua.

 

Ebony G. Patterson (n. 1981, Kingston, Jamaica; vive en Chicago, IL, y Kingston)

. . . the wailing . . . guides us home… and there is a bellying on the land . . . , 2021
Materiales mixtos sobre tapiz fotográfico tejido en jacquard y papel de vinilo a medida

Por cortesía de la artista y la Monique Meloche Gallery, Chicago

 

Félix González-Torres (n. 1957, Guáimaro, Cuba; f. 1996, Miami, FL; vivió en Nueva York, NY)

“Untitled”, 1995
Cartelera

Por cortesía del Estate of Félix González-Torres

 

Félix González-Torres (n. 1957, Guáimaro, Cuba; f. 1996, Miami, FL; vivió en Nueva York, NY)

“Untitled” (Passport), 1991
Papel, suministro interminable

Por favor toma solo uno.

Marieluise Hessel Collection, Hessel Museum of Art, Center for Curatorial Studies, Bard College, Annandale-on-Hudson, Nueva York

 

Frank Bowling (n. 1934, Bartica, Guyana; vive en Londres, Reino Unido)

Bartica, 1968–69
Pintura acrílica y tinta serigrafiada sobre lienzo

Sheldon Inwentash y Lynn Factor, Toronto

 

Julien Creuzet (n. 1986, Le Blanc-Mesnil, Francia; vive en París, Francia)

it’s a sad day
in Morne à l’eau
volcano body volcano
tumor mood
blood pool
fucking sweet half moon
damn black rotten banana
today no more smile
do you like my english banana
factory,
Pesticide
in my mother’s
chest Checkmate
tropical hospital
will you heal in peace
container ship
in the middle of the cluster
cluster body bark
terror will you transport my
Ocean
racher, tout du dedans bien pris
en dedans
racher, tout tout tou pris dans
le dedans (Papua New Guinea)
, 2021
Acero cortado con láser

Por cortesía del artista y DOCUMENT, Chicago, IL

 

Julien Creuzet (n. 1986, Le Blanc-Mesnil, Francia; vive en París, Francia)

it’s a sad day
in Morne à l’eau
volcano body volcano
tumor mood
blood pool
fucking sweet half moon
damn black rotten banana
today no more smile
do you like my english banana
factory,
Pesticide
in my mother’s
chest Checkmate
tropical hospital
will you heal in peace
container ship
in the middle of the cluster
cluster body bark
terror will you transport my
Ocean
racher, tout du dedans bien pris
en dedans
racher, tout tout tou pris
dans le dedans (Virginia)
, 2021
Acero cortado con láser

Por cortesía del artista y DOCUMENT, Chicago, IL

 

Julien Creuzet (n. 1986, Le Blanc-Mesnil, Francia; vive en París, Francia)

Crossroads, 2022
Vídeo de alta definición (HD) (color, sonido)
7 minutos, 35 segundos

Por cortesía del artista y DOCUMENT, Chicago, IL

El audio de esta obra de arte consiste en música producida por el artista y alguien recitando palabra hablada el criollo de Martinica.

 

Keith Piper (n. 1960, Malta; vive en Londres, Inglaterra)

Trade Winds, 1992
Vídeo, audio y cajones de madera

Por cortesía del artista

El audio de esta obra de arte consiste en unos vientos soplando fuertemente además de unos extractos de la canción “Columbus” de Burning Spear y del documental de 1984 Africa: A Voyage of Discovery (África: un viaje de descubrimiento). Una transcripción para esta obra de arte está disponible en: mcachicago.org/forecastform.

 

Lorraine O’Grady (n. 1934, Boston, MA; vive en Nueva York, NY)

The Strange Taxi: From Africa to Jamaica to Boston in 200 Years, 1991/2019
Impresión con pigmento de imagen de archivo sobre papel Hahnemühle Baryta Photo Rag de algodón puro

Por cortesía de Alexander Gray Associates, Nueva York

 

Peter Doig (n. 1959, Edimburgo, Escocia; vive en Londres, Inglaterra, y Puerto España, Trinidad y Tobago)

Black Curtain (Towards Monkey Island), 2004
Óleo sobre lino

Mima and César Reyes Collection

 

ABOVE

Rafael Ferrer (n. 1933, San Juan, Puerto Rico; vive en Long Island, NY)

Ciclón en el Mar de la China, 1977
Óleo y esmalte sobre acero, alambre y madera

Colección Museo de arte contemporáneo Chicago, donación de Earl y Betsy Millard, 1991.35.a-b

 

Tomm El-Saieh (n. 1984, Puerto Príncipe, Haití; vive en Miami, FL)

Cursive Grid, 2017–18
Acrílico sobre lienzo

Colección de Nancy y David Frej

 

Joscelyn Gardner (n. 1961, Barbados; vive en Ontario, Canadá)

Coffea Arabica (Clarissa) from Creole Portraits III: “bringing down the flowers . . . ”, 2011

Manihot flabellifolia (Old Catalina) from Creole Portraits III: “bringing down the flowers . . . ”, 2011

Convolvulus jalapa (Yara) from Creole Portraits III: “bringing down the flowers . . . ”, 2010

Poinciana pulcherrima (Lilith) from Creole Portraits III: “bringing down the flowers . . . ”, 2009

Veronica frutescens (Mazerine) from Creole Portraits III: “bringing down the flowers . . . ”, 2009

Litografías coloreadas a mano sobre Mylar esmerilado

Estas obras de arte forman parte de la serie de Joscelyn Gardner, Creole Portraits III: “bringing down the flowers . . .”, la cual consiste en un conjunto de trece retratos de mujeres afrocaribeñas esclavizadas. Aquí, un enredo particular de un peinado trezando, un collar de esclava y una planta capaz de inducir el aborto representa a cada mujer.

Creole Portraits III responde a los diarios del capataz de una plantación inglesa del siglo dieciocho, Thomas Thistlewood. En sus diarios, Thistlewood detalló unos miles de actos de violencia sexual, violación y otros tipos de tortura que él cometió en contra de las personas esclavizadas en la Egypt Plantation de Westmoreland, Jamaica. Cada uno titulado con el nombre de un abortivo natural y de una mujer esclavizada nombrada en los diarios de Thistlewood, los retratos de Gardner abordan una historia de resistencia no mencionada por Thistlewood pero que, no obstante, persistió: cómo las mujeres esclavizadas consumieron ciertas plantas para interrumpir los embarazos no deseados y ejercer el control sobre sus propios cuerpos.

Colección Chocolate Cortés